Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ECON 0100-001 Introduction to Micro Economics Anne L Duchene MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector
ECON 0100-002 Introduction to Micro Economics Anne L Duchene MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector
ECON 0120-401 Strategic Reasoning Deniz Selman MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is about strategically interdependent decisions. In such situations, the outcome of your actions depends also on the actions of others. When making your choice, you have to think what the others will choose, who in turn are thinking what you will be choosing, and so on. Game Theory offers several concepts and insights for understanding such situations, and for making better strategic choices. This course will introduce and develop some basic ideas from game theory, using illustrations, applications, and cases drawn from business, economics, politics, sports, and even fiction and movies. Some interactive games will be played in class. There will be little formal theory, and the only pre-requisites are some high-school algebra and having taken Econ 1. However, general numeracy (facility interpreting and doing numerical graphs, tables, and arithmetic calculations) is very important. This course will also be accepted by the Economics department as an Econ course, to be counted toward the minor in Economics (or as an Econ elective). PPE3001401
ECON 0200-001 Introductory Economics: Macro Luca Bossi MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. An examination of a market economy to provide an understanding of how the size and composition of national output are determined. Elements of monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, economic development, and comparative economic systems. Society Sector https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON0200001
ECON 0200-002 Introductory Economics: Macro Luca Bossi MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. An examination of a market economy to provide an understanding of how the size and composition of national output are determined. Elements of monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, economic development, and comparative economic systems. Society Sector https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON0200002
ECON 0200-601 Introductory Economics: Macro Ozgur Seker T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. An examination of a market economy to provide an understanding of how the size and composition of national output are determined. Elements of monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, economic development, and comparative economic systems. Society Sector
ECON 0420-001 Political Economy Deniz Selman TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course examines the effects of strategic behavior on political outcomes and government policies. Topics and applications may include voting behavior, candidate competition, voting systems, social choice and welfare, policy divergence, redistributive policies and theories of political transitions.
ECON 0465-001 Economics and Philosophy Michael Kane MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course examines some of the ways in which economics as a social science is related to philosophy. We start with a discussion of the definition, scope, and methodology of economics, reading Robbins on the definition of economics, Mill on the science of political economy and Friedman’s essay on methodology, along with some of its critical responses. We then consider three central concepts of economics which have their roots in philosophy: rationality, utility, and welfare, and we examine the philosophical assumptions in each of these economic concepts.
Economics assumes a form of instrumental rationality by which individuals seek to maximize their utility. We consider the origins of this concept of rationality, its extension into rational choice theory, and the critiques it has inspired. Our next topic is the concept of utility, which originates in philosophy but which receives a technical definition in economics. Finally, we turn to welfare economics, which is the most normative part of economic science, where we consider topics such as preference satisfaction and interpersonal comparisons of utility. We also raise the question throughout whether these concepts are rightly used in economics, and whether welfare economics can in fact promote well-being.
In addition to the four major topics (methodology, rationality, utility, and welfare), we will also devote one class each to four topics debated in journal articles by some of the most important economists in recent history. These topics are:
--Is underinvestment in basic research a market failure? (Arrow v. Demsetz);
--What are the market consequences of imperfect information? (Hayek v. Stiglitz);
--What are the moral dimensions of economic growth, specifically as it relates to the environment? (B. Friedman v. T. Jackson);
--Is it ethical for the state to “nudge” citizens towards desired behaviors? (Thaler and Sunstein v. Grüne-Yanoff); and
Reviewing the views expressed in these debates will allow students to form their own opinions on major topics in economics where the arguments are largely philosophical. The goal of the overall course is to help students develop a more critical understanding of the assumptions of economics as it’s practiced as a social science.
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON0465001
ECON 0500-001 International Economics Iourii Manovskii TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Introduction to the theory of international trade and international monetary economics. The theoretical background is used as a basis for discussion of policy issues. Patterns of international trade and production; gains from trade; tariffs, and impediments to trade; foreign exchange markets, balance of payments, capital flows, financial crises, coordination of monetary and fiscal policy in a global economy.
ECON 0615-401 The History of the International Monetary System and the Rise of the US Dollar Maylis Avaro
Marc R Flandreau
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM The course will cover the modern evolution of the international monetary system going all the way back to the era when sterling became the leading international currencies. It is arranged thematically and chronologically both. The lessons and readings will introduce students to the principal evolutions of the international monetary system and at the same time, it will give them an understanding of regimes, their mechanics and the geopolitical economies behind systemic shifts. Students need not have an economic background but must be prepared to read about exchange rates (and world politics). Special focus on: The early modern international monetary system. How Amsterdam and London captured the Spanish treasure. Beyond the West (Ottoman Empire, India, China). The Napoleonic wars and the rise of sterling. Hong-Kong: Silver, Opium, and the Recycling of Surpluses. The emergence of the Gold Standard. Bimetallism: The US election of 1796. Sterling and Key Currencies before WWI. The First World War and the origins of dollar supremacy. When the dollar displaced sterling (1920s). The collapse of the international gold standard (1930s). The Bretton Woods System. The rise and rise of the US dollar. Currency competition (Dollar, Euro, Yuan Renminbi). The meaning of cryptocurrencies. HIST3965401
ECON 0625-401 Introduction to Business, Economic and Financial History Marc R Flandreau R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Business, Economic and Financial History plays a crucial role today in informing the views of business leaders, policy makers, reformers and public intellectuals. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to acquire a command of the key elements of this important intellectual field. The seminar format enables us to do this engagingly through reading and discussion. Students acquire a knowledge of the fundamental texts and controversies. Each meeting focuses on one foundational debate and provides a means to be up to date with the insights gleaned from rigorous economic history. We will examine twelve important debates and students will be asked to write a paper. The debates will include such questions as: What is growth and how can it be measured? What caused the "great divergence" in long run development among countries? How can we "understand" the rise and fall of slavery and its long shadow today? What is globalization and when did it begin? Did the Gold Standard and interwar fiscal and monetary policy orthodoxy cause the great depression? How can we explain the evolution of inequality in the very long run? HIST3710401
ECON 0630-401 The Economics and Financing of Health Care Delivery Alexander Olssen TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM The course provides an application of economic models to demand, supply, and their interaction in the medical economy. Influences on demand, especially health status, insurance coverage, and income will be analyzed. Physician decisions on the pricing and form of their own services, and on the advice they offer about other services, will be considered. Competition in medical care markets, especially for hospital services, will be studied. Special emphasis will be placed on government as demander of medical care services. Changes in Medicare and regulation of managed care are among the public policy issues to be addressed. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permission of instructor required. HCMG2020401
ECON 2100-001 Intermediate Microeconomics George J Mailath TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Theories of consumer behavior, demand, production, costs, the firm in various market contexts, factor employment, factor incomes, elementary general equilibrium, and welfare.
ECON 2200-001 Intermediate Macroeconomics Harold L Cole TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Facts and theories about the determination of per capita income and its differences across countries and across time. The study of economic fluctuations in output and employment. The role of government in influencing these aggregate variables: monetary and fiscal policy.
ECON 2300-001 Statistics for Economists Karun Adusumilli TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM The course focuses on elementary probability and inferential statistical techniques. The course begins with a survey of basic descriptive statistics and data sources and then covers elementary probability theory, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. The course focuses on practical issues involved in the substantive interpretation of economic data using the techniques of statistical inference. For this reason empirical case studies that apply the techniques to real-life data are stressed and discussed throughout the course, and students are required to perform several statistical analyses of their own. Quantitative Data Analysis
ECON 2310-001 Econometric Methods and Models Xu Cheng MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course focuses on econometric techniques and their application in economic analysis and decision-making, building on ECON 2300 to incorporate the many regression complications that routinely occur in econometric environments. Micro-econometric complications include nonlinearity, non-normality, heteroskedasticity, limited dependent variables of various sorts, endogeneity and instrumental variables, and panel data. Macro-econometric topics include trend, seasonality, serial correlation, lagged dependent variables, structural change, dynamic heteroskedasticity, and optimal prediction. Students are required to perform several econometric analyses in a modern environment such as R. Quantitative Data Analysis
ECON 4100-001 Game Theory Steven A Matthews MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM An introduction to game theory and its applications to economic analysis. The course will provide a theoretical overview of modern game theory, emphasizing common themes in the analysis of strategic behavior in different social science contexts. The economic applications will be drawn from different areas including trade, corporate strategy and public policy. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON4100001
ECON 4150-001 Mathematical Economics Andrew Postlewaite TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This semester long course will introduce students to a variety of mathematical topics associated with convexity, optimization and fixed points that are used in Economic theory. The use of these techniques will be illustrated with a host of economic applications. Students who have not taken ECON 2100 require instructor permission. 2023a_econ4150_postlewaite.pdf42.5 KB
ECON 4200-001 Economic Growth Joachim Hubmer TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM The process of economic growth and the sources of differences in economic performance across nations are some of the most interesting, important and challenging areas in modern social science. You cannot travel or read the news without wondering why differences in standards of living among countries are so large. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduate students to these major issues and to the theoretical tools necessary for studying them. The course therefore strives to provide students with a solid background in dynamic economic analysis, as well as empirical examples and data analysis. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON4200001
ECON 4210-001 Numerical Methods for Macroeconomists Jeremy Greenwood MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course will study numerical methods as used in modern macroeconomics. Students will learn how to solve nonlinear equations, difference equations, interpolate functions, smooth data, and conduct Monte Carlo simulations on the computer. This will be done while studying economic problems, such as the determination of labor supply, economic growth and business cycle analysis. Calculus is an integral part of the course and some elementary probability theory will be drawn upon. The MATLAB programming language will be used.
ECON 4230-001 Macro-Modeling Jose-Victor Rios-Rull MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This is an advanced undergraduate course in models of economic growth. Students will be introduced to the workhorse theoretical models that are used to understand growth by modern macroeconomic researchers and policy makers. The types of questions that we will address include: Why are some countries richer than others? Why do some countries grow quickly while others stagnate? Why did modern economic growth start in Western Europe? What can governments do to accelerate economic growth? How does economic growth interact with demographic and geographic factors? We will build theoretical models that can be used to answer these questions. There will be a strong focus on emphasizing the microeconomic foundations of models, and using the language of mathematics to express the underlying assumptions and assess their implications for policy. Hence, there are strict mathematical prerequisites. We will also compare the predictions of our models with the data. Thus, a fair amount of econometrics will be required. A class in statistics and econometrics is highly recommended.
ECON 4310-001 Macro-Econometric Techniques and Applications Frank Schorfheide TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course provides a deeper treatment of time-series econometric methods used in macroeconomc and financial applications, such as nonstationarity, unit roots, and cointegration; structural evolution and breaks; point, interval and density forecasts; forecast evaluation and combination; vector autoregression including impulse-response estimation and analysis; dynamic factor models and dimensionality reduction; univariate and multivariate stochastic volatility models; and prediction markets. Quantitative Data Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON4310001
ECON 4320-001 Micro-econometric Techniques and Applications Petra Todd TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course provides a deeper treatment of econometric methods and issues as relevant for microeconomic applications, such as non-parametric function estimation; endogeneity and identification (strong and weak); generalized method of moments estimation; randomized and quasi-randomized methods for causal estimation; design strategies such as regression discontinuity and differences-in-differences; program evaluation; and quantile regression. Quantitative Data Analysis
ECON 4420-001 Political Economy Juliette Fournier MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course examines the political and economic determinants of government policies. The course presents economic arguments for government action in the private economy. How government decides policies via simple majority voting, representative legislatures, and executive veto and agenda-setting politics will be studied. Applications include government spending and redistributive policies.
ECON 4430-001 Labor Economics Andrew J Shephard TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM Labor supply and labor demand, income distribution, labor market contracts and work incentives, human capital, labor market discrimination, job training and unemployment.
ECON 4460-001 Health Economics Juan Pablo Atal TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM In this course we will use the tools of microeconomics to analyze the functioning of the health care system. We will draw from the sub-disciplines of information economics, industrial organization, labor economics, public economics, and behavioral economics. The primary goal is to use these tools to develop a critical analysis of the functioning of the health care system as well as of the policies aimed at improving it. We will learn about US specific institutional details and policies (most notably the Affordable Care Act), and we will compare them to other important international experiences.
ECON 4470-001 Urban Fiscal Policy Holger Wolfgang Sieg TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The purpose of this course is to examine the financing of governments in the urban economy. Topics to be covered include the causes and consequences of the urban fiscal crisis, the design of optimal tax and spending policies for local governments, funding of public infrastructures and the workings of the municipal bond market, privatization of government services, and public financial systems for emerging economies. Applications include analyses of recent fiscal crises, local services and taxes as important determinants of real estate prices, the infrastructure crisis, financing and the provision of public education, and fiscal constitutions for new democracies using South Africa as an example. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON4470001
ECON 4490-001 The Digital Economy Juan C Castillo Hernandez MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This is an advanced undergraduate course on the digital economy. Our two main goals are (a) to understand how people and companies interact in digital markets and (b) to understand how digital markets should be designed. The course uses a combination of theoretical modeling and empirical evidence in order to achieve those goals. We analyze some key features that are prevalent in digital markets, including network effects, two-sided markets, search and matching, reputation systems, and the use of data. We also zoom in on individual markets, such as search engines, e-commerce platforms, and the gig economy. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON4490001
ECON 4510-001 International Trade Iourii Manovskii TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Structure of the world economy; theory of international trade; economic growth and international trade; international trade policy: developed countries; developing countries. Direct investment, technology transfers, and the multinational firm.
ECON 4520-001 International Finance MW 8:30 AM-9:59 AM International monetary economics with emphasis on economic policy in an open economy. Topics covered in the course include: balance-of-payments adjustment, theories of exchange rate determinaton, the effects of exchange rate devaluation, macroeconomic policy under fixed and floating exchange rates, the Euro-dollar market, currency and balance of payments crises.
ECON 4545-001 Finance and Growth from a Historical Perspective Ivan Luzardo MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course focuses on the interception between finance and economic growth by studying some of the most important events in economic history that have taken place over the last few centuries. Starting with the emergence of the modern capital markets and economic growth, the course examines in depth, major developments in financial history, such as the classical gold standard, the origins of central banking, the Great Depression, and the Bretton Woods system. However, this course goes beyond any standard course on financial history and examines how finance has affected economic growth in the long-run, from an international perspective and starts in the seventeenth century in Europe, up to the 1990s in South-East Asia. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON4545001
ECON 4550-001 The Political Economy of Early America Fernando Arteaga
Kyu Been Chun
MW 8:30 AM-9:59 AM This course will study the political economy of Early America, from the British Settlement to c. 1820. In particular, we will explore the forces behind the economic growth of the British colonies, the economic forces behind the Revolution, the economic consequences of the Revolution, the political economy of the constitutional convention and ratification, the role of SCOTUS in creating a national market, and the opposing Hamilton-Jefferson views of an American economy. Early America is a fascinating and rich historical period, and we will need to skip many issues of interest. Nevertheless, we hope to provide you with a good overview of how a group of small peripheral colonies created an institutional arrangement that allowed them, in less than two centuries, to become the biggest economy in the world. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON4550001
ECON 4560-001 History of Economic Thought Fernando Arteaga MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course surveys the history of the development of economic thought, beginning with the Classical school and the works of Smith, Ricardo, J.S. Mill, Marx and others and continuing to the 20th century thought, including Keynes, Hayek, and Arrow. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON4560001
ECON 4910-001 Honors Seminar (II) Jere R Behrman Students prepare an honors thesis in economics over the academic year, supervised by a faculty member of their choice. In ECON 4900 (fall) and ECON 4910 (spring), students present their work in progress to the class. Any student intending to do empirical work in the thesis should have completed ECON 2300 and ECON 2310.
ECON 6110-001 Game Theory and Applications. Kevin He MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM A graduate level introduction to decision making under uncertainty, applied game theory, and information economics. Perm Needed From Instructor https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON6110001
ECON 7110-001 Microeconomic Theory II George J Mailath TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Game theory, decision making under uncertainty, information economics. Perm Needed From Department
ECON 7210-001 Macroeconomic Theory II Jeremy Greenwood
Jose-Victor Rios-Rull
MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Equilibrium notions in the growth model. Economies with distortions. Incomplete markets. Overlapping generations. Perm Needed From Department
ECON 7310-001 Econometrics II: Methods & Models Wayne Gao
Frank Schorfheide
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Analysis in time and frequency domains, state space representations, Kalman filtering, conditional heteroskedasticity, nonlinear and nonparametric methods for time series, integration, co-integration, numerical and simulation techniques. Perm Needed From Department
ECON 7500B-001 Third Year PhD Research Seminar Guillermo L Ordonez R 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Transition from student to frontier researcher is quite difficult. This course is aimed at starting our graduate students on their first major paper. It will meet once a week over the entire year. Only offered to the Economics Department 3rd year PhD students. A important element in the course is developing what is essentially a study group of the participants to give each other feedback and suggestions. Students should anticipate doing a 30 minute
presentation every 2-3 weeks.
Perm Needed From Department
ECON 8000-001 Topics in Advanced Microeconomic Theory Xiao Lin MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON8000001
ECON 8000-002 Topics in Advanced Microeconomic Theory Kevin He MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON8000002
ECON 8100-301 Economic Theory Kevin He T 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Workshop
ECON 8100-302 Economic Theory M 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Workshop
ECON 8200-001 Topics in Advanced Macroeconomics Enrique Gabriel Mendoza M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department
ECON 8200-002 Topics in Advanced Macroeconomics Jeremy Greenwood M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department Econ8200 J Greenwwod.pdf178 KB
ECON 8200-003 Topics in Advanced Macroeconomics Jose-Victor Rios-Rull M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department
ECON 8200-004 Topics in Advanced Macroeconomics Harold L Cole MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department Syllabus2023- Hal Cole.pdf68 KB
ECON 8200-006 Topics in Advanced Macroeconomics Benjamin Russell Lester T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department Syllabus_Spring_2023-Benjamin Lester.pdf85 KB
ECON 8210-001 Quantitative MacroEconomic Theory T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Computation of Equilibria. Calibration of models. Heterogenous agents, macroeconomic models.
ECON 8300-001 Topics in Advanced Econometrics Xu Cheng W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department
ECON 8320-001 Econometrics IV: Advanced Techniques of Time-Series Econometrics Frank Schorfheide TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Focuses on macro-econometrics. Topics include comparison of Bayesian and frequentist inference in nonstandard settings (e.g. time series models with persistent roots), Bayesian inference in VARS and DSGE models including modern computational tools such as Gibbs sampling, MCMC, Sequential Monte Carlo, particle filtering, etc., and tools for evaluating DSGE models. Perm Needed From Department
ECON 8400-001 Topics in Advanced Empirical Microeconomics Holger Wolfgang Sieg MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department out_ppe_s23.pdf69.94 KB https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON8400001
ECON 8400-002 Topics in Advanced Empirical Microeconomics Juan Pablo Atal
Juan C Castillo Hernandez
TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=ECON8400002
ECON 8400-003 Topics in Advanced Empirical Microeconomics Andrew J Shephard TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Topics in Advanced Economic Theory and Mathematical Economics Perm Needed From Department
ECON 9110-301 Applied Microeconomics Workshop Kevin He F 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Workshop Perm Needed From Department
ECON 9110-302 Applied Microeconomics Workshop F 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Workshop Perm Needed From Department
ECON 9200-301 Monetary Economics Joachim Hubmer W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Workshop Perm Needed From Department
ECON 9200-302 Monetary Economics WF 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Workshop Perm Needed From Department
ECON 9300-301 Econometrics Xu Cheng M 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Workshop Perm Needed From Department
ECON 9300-302 Econometrics M 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Workshop
ECON 9400-301 Empirical Microeconomics Francesco Agostinelli R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Workshop Perm Needed From Instructor
ECON 9400-302 Empirical Microeconomics T 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Workshop Perm Needed From Department
ECON 9450-301 Industrial Organization Juan Pablo Atal W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Workshop Perm Needed From Department