Courses for Fall 2019

Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ECON 001-001 Introduction To Micro Economics Anne L. Duchene MEYH B1 MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Syllabus ECON1 F19.pdf362.49 KB
ECON 001-002 Introduction To Micro Economics Anne L. Duchene MEYH B1 MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Syllabus ECON1 F19_0.pdf362.49 KB
ECON 001-003 Introduction To Micro Economics Anne L. Duchene MEYH B1 MW 09:00 AM-10:00 AM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Syllabus ECON1 F19_1.pdf362.49 KB
ECON 001-601 Intro Econ Micro PCPE 203 T 06:00 PM-09:00 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector
ECON 002-001 Introductory Economics: Macro Luca Bossi PCPE AUD MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. An examination of a market economy to provide an understanding of how the size and composition of national output are determined. Elements of monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, economic development, and comparative economic systems. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ECON 002-002 Introductory Economics: Macro Luca Bossi PCPE AUD MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. An examination of a market economy to provide an understanding of how the size and composition of national output are determined. Elements of monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, economic development, and comparative economic systems. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ECON 010-001 Introduction To Economics For Business Gizem Saka JMHH G06 MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM The first part of the course covers basic microeconomic concepts such as opportunity cost, comparative advantage, supply and demand, importance of costs and revenues under perfect competition vs. monopoly, externalities and public goods. The second part of the course introduces macroeconomic data, two models of the labor market, a model of the aggregate household, and the standard AD-AS model. The course concludes with an introduction to fiscal policy, banking, and the role of the Central Bank. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ECON 010-002 Introduction To Economics For Business Gizem Saka JMHH G06 MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The first part of the course covers basic microeconomic concepts such as opportunity cost, comparative advantage, supply and demand, importance of costs and revenues under perfect competition vs. monopoly, externalities and public goods. The second part of the course introduces macroeconomic data, two models of the labor market, a model of the aggregate household, and the standard AD-AS model. The course concludes with an introduction to fiscal policy, banking, and the role of the Central Bank. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ECON 013-401 Strategic Reasoning David Dillenberger STIT B6 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course is about strategically interdependent decisions. In such situations, the outcome of your actions depends also on the actions of others. When making your choice, you have to think what the others will choose, who in turn are thinking what you will be choosing, and so on. Game Theory offers several concepts and insights for understanding such situations, and for making better strategic choices. This course will introduce and develop some basic ideas from game theory, using illustrations, applications, and cases drawn from business, economics, politics, sports, and even fiction and movies. Some interactive games will be played in class. There will be little formal theory, and the only pre-requisites are some high-school algebra and having taken ECON 001. However, general numeracy (facility interpreting and doing numerical graphs, tables, and arithmetic calculations) is very important. This course will also be accepted by the Economics department as an Econ course, to be counted toward the minor in Economics (or as an Econ elective). PPE311401
ECON 028-401 Financial Meltdown, Past and Present Marc Flandreau STIT B26 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters. HIST131401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Humanities & Social Science Sector
ECON 039-401 Econ & Fincing-Hlthcr Dl Molly Candon CPCR AUD MW 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The course provides an application of economic models to demand, supply, and their interaction in the medical economy. Influences on demand, especially health status, insurance coverage, and income will be analyzed. Physician decisions on the pricing and form of their own services, and on the advice they offer about other services, will be considered. Competition in medical care markets, especially for hospital services, will be studied. Special emphasis will be placed on government as demander of medical care services. Changes in Medicare and regulation of managed care are among the public policy issues to be addressed. HCMG202401
ECON 050-001 International Economics Luca Bossi PCPE 200 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Introduction to the theory of international trade and international monetary economics. The theoretical background is used as a basis for discussion of policy issues. Patterns of international trade and production; gains from trade; tariffs, and impediments to trade; foreign exchange markets, balance of payments, capital flows, financial crises, coordination of monetary and fiscal policy in a global economy.
ECON 101-001 Intermed Microeconomics Rakesh V. Vohra STIT B6 TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM Theories of consumer behavior, demand, production, costs, the firm in various market contexts, factor employment, factor incomes, elementary general equilibrium, and welfare. Registration also required for Recitation (see below) econ101fall2019.pdf130.93 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019C&course=ECON101001
ECON 102-001 Intermed Macroeconomics Dirk Krueger BENN 419 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Facts and theories about the determination of per capita income and its differences across countries and across time. The study of economic fluctuations in output and employment. The role of government in influencing these aggregate variables: monetary and fiscal policy. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ECON 103-001 Stat For Economists PCPE AUD MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM The course focuses on elementary probability and inferential statistical techniques. The course begins with a survey of basic descriptive statistics and data sources and then covers elementary probability theory, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. The course focuses on practical issues involved in the substantive interpretation of economic data using the techniques of statistical inference. For this reason empirical case studies that apply the techniques to real-life data are stressed and discussed throughout the course, and students are required to perform several statistical analyses of their own. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ECON 104-001 Econometrics Francis X. Diebold PCPE AUD TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to econometric techniques and their applications in economic analysis and decision-making. The main objective of the course is to train the student in (i) handling economic data; (ii) quantitative analyses of economic models with probabilistic tools; (iii) econometric techniques, their application as well as their statistical and practical interpretation; (iv) implementing these techniques on a computer. Estimation and inference procedures are formally analyzed for simple econometric models and illustrated by empirical case studies using real-life data. The course covers linear regression models, simultaneous-equations models, discrete choice models and univariate time series models. Estimation and Inference is conducted using least squares and likelihood based techniques. Students are required to perform several econometric analyses of their own. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ECON 210-001 Economics of Family Jeremy Greenwood FAGN 218 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course will use economic tools to explore decision making and allocation of resources within the family. The course will use both economic theory and econometric evidence to investigate these issues. The impact of gender roles and differences will be examined and the effect of these differences on economic decisions and outcomes both within and outside the family will be discussed. Student participation will be an integral part of the course. During class, students will be required to evaluate data and relate it to the theoretic model covered. Student participation will also include two in-class oral presentations. Students will be working with CWiC (Communication Within the Curriculum) as they work on these presentations.
ECON 212-001 Game Theory Annie Liang GLAB 101 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM An introduction to game theory and its applications to economic analysis. The course will provide a theoretical overview of modern game theory, emphasizing common themes in the analysis of strategic behavior in different social science contexts. The economic applications will be drawn from different areas including trade, corporate strategy and public policy. Permission Needed From Instructor
ECON 224-001 Statistical Learning and Causal Inference For Economics CANCELED ECON 224 is an applied data analysis course that introduces students to ideas from modern statistical learning and causal inference, and provides hands-on experience applying them to real-world problems using the R statistical programming language. Topics include regression, randomized controlled trials, classification, instrumental variables, shrinkage methods, random forests, regression discontinuity, and differences-in-differences.
ECON 231-001 Public Finance Hanming Fang MCNB 150 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course has two parts. The first looks at market and government failures and discusses the need for public policies as well as limits to their effectiveness including the evaluation of public projects using cost benefit analysis. The second part focuses on the economic analysis of taxation, including the economic incidence and efficiency of taxes. Permission Needed From Department
ECON 233-001 Labor Economics Petra E. Todd PCPE 200 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Labor supply and labor demand, income distribution, labor market contracts and work incentives, human capital, labor market discrimination, job training and unemployment.
ECON 235-001 Industrial Organization Deniz Selman MCNB 286-7 TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Theories of various industrial organizational structures and problems are developed, including monopoly, oligopoly, nonlinear pricing and price discrimination. These theories are used to model various industries, antitrust cases, and regulatory issues.
ECON 238-001 Economics of Education Francesco Agostinelli MCNB 285 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM The course focuses on the educational decisions, including individual choices, institutional strategies and government policies. It is an elective course in economics and it is designed for junior and senior students. During the first part of the course we will go over the mathematical and empirical tools needed to understand and perform quantitative analysis on topics in the economics of education. Students should expect to work on optimization methods, regression analysis and causal inference analysis. We will use Stata (https://www.stata.com/) as statistical software. After we have built a solid foundation of knowledge, we will cover the first "real" topic of the economics of education: the return to schooling. During this phase of the course we seek to address two questions: what are the benefits that an individual acquires (i.e. in terms of earnings in the labor market or career opportunities) by attending more years of school and what are the benefits for society as a whole? While these questions seem to have a simple explanation, we will discover that they are actually quite challenging and require a more complex explanation. Once we have analyzed the benefits of schooling, we will study what motivates some students to further their education for more years, as opposed to others. In particular, we will focus on the differences in the quality of environments that children face throughout childhood (e.g.: family environment and school/classroom environment) and the consequences for observed inequities. Finally, in the remaining portion of the course we will study the evaluations of different policies that have been implemented in the past from previous governments, with the goal of gaining insight for possible future policy recommendations.
ECON 241-001 Economic Growth Joachim Hubmer PCPE 101 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The process of economic growth and the sources of differences in economic performance across nations are some of the most interesting, important and challenging areas in modern social science. You cannot travel or read the news without wondering why differences in standards of living among countries are so large. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduate students to these major issues nd to the theoretical tools necessary for studying them. The course therefore strives to provide students with a solid background in dynamic economic analysis, as well as empirical examples and data analysis. ECON241_Fall2019_Syllabus_Draft_July31.pdf118.69 KB
ECON 246-001 Money and Banking Harold L. Cole MCNB 286-7 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Money and Banking. This course studies the role that financial markets, institutions, and money play in resource allocation. Financial intermediation and the role of banks in the economic system are analyzed and the economic rationale behind banking regulation is studies. The course examines how monetary policy influences interest rates and asset markets, such as the bond market and the stock market. Finally, the instruments and goals of monetary policy are discussed, focusing in particular on credibility and commitment for central banks. All of the questions are explored analytically, using the tools of economic theory.
ECON 252-001 International Finance Alessandro Dovis EDUC 203 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM International monetary economics with emphasis on economic policy in an open economy. Topics covered in the course include: balance-of-payments adjustment, theories of exchange rate determinaton, the effects of exchange rate devaluation, macroeconomic policy under fixed and floating exchange rates, the Euro-dollar market, currency and balance of payments crises.
ECON 261-001 Topics in Development CANCELED This course studies institutions in developing economies. The first section of the course will cover the organization of production in traditional agrarian societies. Topics will include land, labor and credit markets. The second section of the course will focus on the role of the community in facilitating the transition to the modern market economy. Here we will study how the community spreads information, permits the formation of informal networks and organizes collective institutions, allowing individuals to take advantage of new economic opportunities.
ECON 271-001 Foundations of Mkt Econ Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde MCNB 286-7 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course will study the historical and intellectual forces behind the appearance of market economies on the world stage. The voyages of exploration undertaken by Europeans in the 15th and 16th century created, in just a few decades, a global economy. By 1600, silver from Mexico was exchanged in Manila for ceramics made in Nanjing (China). After a long trip through the Pacific, Mexico, and the Atlantic, the ceramics ended up in the tables of prosperous merchants in Bruges (modern day Belgium). How did this integrated global economy appear? How did global interconnections over the centuries shap our current world? How did markets emerge and influence these interconnections? Who were the winners of globalization? And who were the losers? How did economists, political scientists, and others think about the strengths and weakness of market economies? This course will explore these questions and the role that markets have played in it from the late 15th century to the present. Even if the economic theory will structure much of the discussion, insights from intellectual history, cultural history, microhistory, legal history, and institutional history will help to frame the main narrative. The course will be, as well, truly global. First, beyond the traditional focus of economic history courses on Europe and the Americas, particular attention will be devoted to Africa and Asia. Second, the priority will be to highlight the interconnections between the different regions and to understand how the people living in them negotiated the opportunities and tensions created by the economic transformations triggered by globalization and how they conceptualized the changing lives around them. Finally, the class will highlight how diverse intellectual traditions handled the challenges presented by historical change. Permission Needed From Department
ECON 300-301 Honors Seminar Jere R Behrman PCPE 510 W 03:30 PM-07:00 PM Students prepare an honors thesis in economics over the academic year, supervised by a faculty member of their choice. In both semesters students present their work in progress to the class. Any student intending to do empirical work in the thesis should have completed ECON 103 and ECON 104. Permission Needed From Department
Year Long Course
ECON 300 2019 20 course_description Behrman 1 August 2019.pdf335.24 KB
ECON 681-001 Microeconomic Theory Steven A Matthews MCNB 150 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Basic tools of microeconomic theory: consumer choice, firm behavior, partial and general equilibrium theory. This is a more theoretical treatment of the basic tools of microeconomic analysis than ECON 680. Undergraduates Need Permission
ECON 701-001 Microec Theory I Steven A Matthews
Andrew Postlewaite
PCPE 100 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Nonlinear programming, theory of the consumer and producer, general equilibrium. For Doctoral Students Only
ECON 702-001 Macroec Theory I Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde
Dirk Krueger
PCPE 101 TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM Dynamic programming, search theory, neoclassical growth theory, asset pricing, business cycles. Permission Needed From Department
ECON 702-002 Macroec Theory I Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde PCPE 101 MW 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Dynamic programming, search theory, neoclassical growth theory, asset pricing, business cycles. Permission Needed From Department
ECON 705-001 Econometrics I: Fund Karun Adusumilli
Xu Cheng
PCPE 100 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Violations of classical linear regresson assumptions, nonlinear regression models (including logit, probit, etc.), diagnostic testing, distributed lag models, panel data models, identification, linear simultaneous-equations model. Permission Needed From Department
ECON 712-001 Topics in Applied Micro Hanming Fang PCPE 203 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
ECON 712-002 Diss Proj in Econ Theory Alvaro Sandroni PCPE 203 W 02:00 PM-04:00 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
ECON 712-003 Intro Macro Househld Het Dirk Krueger MCNB 410 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
ECON 712-004 Emprcal Mthd For Counter: Empirical Methods For Counterfactual Analysis Francesco Agostinelli PCPE 225 MW 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
ECON 712-005 Decision Theory David Dillenberger PCPE 203 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
ECON 712-006 Empirical Industrial Org Aviv Nevo CHEM 119 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
ECON 712-007 Learning and Information: Topics in Econ Theory: Learning, and Information Annie Liang PCPE 101 W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Non-Majors Need Permission From Department
ECON 714-001 Quant Macro-Econ Theory Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde PCPE 202 M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Computation of Equilibria. Calibration of models. Heterogenous agents, macroeconomic models.
ECON 719-301 Econ Theory Workshop PCPE 100
PCPE 101
M 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
T 03:30 PM-05:30 PM
ECON 721-001 Econometrics III: Adv Petra E. Todd PCPE 200 TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM Qualitative response models, panel data, censoring, truncation, selection bias, errors in variables, latent variable models, survey design, advanced techniques of semiparametric estimation and inference in cross-sectional environments. Disequilibrium models. Methods of simulated moments.
ECON 729-301 Econometrics Wkshop PCPE 101
PCPE 200
M 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
M 04:00 PM-06:30 PM
ECON 749-301 Montry Econ Workshop PCPE 200
PCPE 200
PCPE 200
R 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
W 03:30 PM-06:00 PM
F 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
ECON 750-001 Public Economics Andrew Postlewaite PCPE 101 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Public goods, externalities, uncertainty, and income redistribution as sources of market failures; private market and collective choice models as possible correcting mechanisms. Microeconomic theories of taxation and political models affecting economic variables.
ECON 759-301 Polit Econ Workshop PCPE 101 M 03:30 PM-05:30 PM
ECON 779-301 Industrial Organization PCPE 100 T 03:30 PM-05:30 PM
ECON 789-301 Appld Micro Theory Wrksp PCPE 100
PCPE 100
F 03:30 PM-05:30 PM
F 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
ECON 799-301 Empirical Microeconomics PCPE 100
PCPE 100
R 03:00 PM-05:30 PM
T 12:00 PM-01:30 PM