Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ECON 001-001 Introduction To Micro Economics Anne L Duchene MEYH B1 MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Syllabus ECON1 F21.pdf161.99 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON001001
ECON 001-002 Introduction To Micro Economics Anne L Duchene MEYH B1 MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Syllabus_Econ002_FA21.pdf216.72 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON001002
ECON 001-003 Introduction To Micro Economics Anne L Duchene MEYH B1 MW 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Syllabus ECON1 F21_0.pdf161.99 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON001003
ECON 001-601 Intro Econ Micro Andrew John Arnold PCPE 225 M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. Theory of supply and demand, costs and revenues of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly, pricing of factors of production, income distribution, and theory of international trade. Econ 1 deals primarily with microeconomics. Society Sector econ1_fall2021_syllabus.pdf77.43 KB
ECON 002-001 Introductory Economics: Macro Luca Bossi PCPE AUD MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. An examination of a market economy to provide an understanding of how the size and composition of national output are determined. Elements of monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, economic development, and comparative economic systems. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON002001
ECON 002-002 Introductory Economics: Macro Luca Bossi PCPE AUD MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Introduction to economic analysis and its application. An examination of a market economy to provide an understanding of how the size and composition of national output are determined. Elements of monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, economic development, and comparative economic systems. Society Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON002002
ECON 010-001 Introduction To Economics For Business Gizem Saka JMHH G06 MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The first part of the course covers basic microeconomic concepts such as opportunity cost, comparative advantage, supply and demand, importance of costs and revenues under perfect competition vs. monopoly, externalities and public goods. The second part of the course introduces macroeconomic data, two models of the labor market, a model of the aggregate household, and the standard AD-AS model. The course concludes with an introduction to fiscal policy, banking, and the role of the Central Bank. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Saka-F 21- Ec10-Syllabus_0.pdf266.84 KB
ECON 010-002 Introduction To Economics For Business Gizem Saka JMHH G06 MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The first part of the course covers basic microeconomic concepts such as opportunity cost, comparative advantage, supply and demand, importance of costs and revenues under perfect competition vs. monopoly, externalities and public goods. The second part of the course introduces macroeconomic data, two models of the labor market, a model of the aggregate household, and the standard AD-AS model. The course concludes with an introduction to fiscal policy, banking, and the role of the Central Bank. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ECON 013-401 Strategic Reasoning David Dillenberger STIT B6 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course is about strategically interdependent decisions. In such situations, the outcome of your actions depends also on the actions of others. When making your choice, you have to think what the others will choose, who in turn are thinking what you will be choosing, and so on. Game Theory offers several concepts and insights for understanding such situations, and for making better strategic choices. This course will introduce and develop some basic ideas from game theory, using illustrations, applications, and cases drawn from business, economics, politics, sports, and even fiction and movies. Some interactive games will be played in class. There will be little formal theory, and the only pre-requisites are some high-school algebra and having taken ECON 001. However, general numeracy (facility interpreting and doing numerical graphs, tables, and arithmetic calculations) is very important. This course will also be accepted by the Economics department as an Econ course, to be counted toward the minor in Economics (or as an Econ elective). Prerequisite: This course course may not be taken concurrently with or after ECON 212. PPE311401 SR_ course outline fall 2021.pdf37.18 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON013401
ECON 029-401 Introduction To Business, Economic, and Financial History Marc R Flandreau CANCELED Business, Economic and Financial History plays a crucial role today in informing the views of business leaders, policy makers, reformers and public intellectuals. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to acquire a command of the key elements of this important intellectual field. The seminar format enables us to do this engagingly through reading and discussion. Students acquire a knowledge of the fundamental texts and controversies. Each meeting focuses on one foundational debate and provides a means to be up to date with the insights gleaned from rigorous economic history. We will examine twelve important debates and students will be asked to write a paper. The debates will include such questions as: What is growth and how can it be measured? What caused the "great divergence" in long run development among countries? How can we "understand" the rise and fall of slavery and its long shadow today? What is globalization and when did it begin? Did the Gold Standard and interwar fiscal and monetary policy orthodoxy cause the great depression? How can we explain the evolution of inequality in the very long run? HIST225401
ECON 039-401 Econ & Fincing-Hlthcr Dl Molly K Candon CPCR AUD MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The course provides an application of economic models to demand, supply, and their interaction in the medical economy. Influences on demand, especially health status, insurance coverage, and income will be analyzed. Physician decisions on the pricing and form of their own services, and on the advice they offer about other services, will be considered. Competition in medical care markets, especially for hospital services, will be studied. Special emphasis will be placed on government as demander of medical care services. Changes in Medicare and regulation of managed care are among the public policy issues to be addressed. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permission of instructor required. HCMG202401 HCMG202 Fall 2021.pdf170.93 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON039401
ECON 045-001 Economics and Fairness Michael Kane PCPE 101 MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Free markets excel at producing wealth, but seem to do so at the cost of economic inequality. Is this inequality unjust? Is it a problem economics and public policy should solve? Liberal democracies have traditionally had the protection of private property as a core mandate. But they also have varying degrees of redistribution in order to fund social welfare systems. How can we reconcile these objectives which seem to conflict? Is the protection of individual rights more important than the promotion of the greatest good for all? To what extent can personal liberty and the common good be reconciled? Are current entitlement programs like Medicare unfair to the younger generation? Is our current natural resource usage unfair to future generations? In this course, we will use the philosophical concept of justice to address these and other related questions. We will draw from the economic history, political theory, and the history of philosophy in order to acquire a framework for understanding the concepts of justice, liberty, rights, and equality. We shall then apply this historical and conceptual framework to discussion topics and case studies drawn from present day economics and contemporary social issues. In this way, we shall come to understand economics as more than a social science of laws and theorems. Instead we shall see how economics as an applied science influences the well-being of the whole of society. Permission Needed From Instructor ECON 045 Prospectus Syllabus FALL 2021_1.pdf200.68 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON045001
ECON 050-001 International Economics Luca Bossi PCPE 101 MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Introduction to the theory of international trade and international monetary economics. The theoretical background is used as a basis for discussion of policy issues. Patterns of international trade and production; gains from trade; tariffs, and impediments to trade; foreign exchange markets, balance of payments, capital flows, financial crises, coordination of monetary and fiscal policy in a global economy. Prerequisite: ECON 050 is a one-semester course in international economics. Students wishing to study the subject in greater depth should take instead the two-semester sequence ECON 251, 252. Syllabus_Econ050_FA21.pdf194.31 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON050001
ECON 101-001 Intermed Microeconomics Rakesh V Vohra STIT B6 TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM Theories of consumer behavior, demand, production, costs, the firm in various market contexts, factor employment, factor incomes, elementary general equilibrium, and welfare. Prerequisite: Incoming freshman wih AP or transfer credit. Upper classmen must have at least a B+ in MATH 104 to take ECON 101 or MATH 114 or MATH 115 concurrently. Registration also required for Recitation (see below) econ101fall2021.pdf136.3 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON101001
ECON 102-001 Intermed Macroeconomics Dirk Krueger PCPE AUD MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Facts and theories about the determination of per capita income and its differences across countries and across time. The study of economic fluctuations in output and employment. The role of government in influencing these aggregate variables: monetary and fiscal policy. FNCE 101 does not satisfy any of the Economics department requirements. Therefore, students are required to take ECON 102. Registration also required for Recitation (see below) Syllabus_Fall2021_0.pdf102.46 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON102001
ECON 103-001 Econometric Data Science Wayne Gao ANNS 110 TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course focuses on data description, probability, and statistics, as relevant for economics. Topics include economic data sources, descriptive statistics, probability distributions and moments, and sampling and sample moments, building to a thorough introduction to linear regression. Focus is on both theoretical and practical issues involved in the substantive interpretation of economic data using econometric techniques. Empirical case studies are discussed throughout, and students are required to perform several econometric analyses in a modern environment such as R. One-term course offered both terms. Notes: Intended primarily for economics majors. ECON 103 cannot be taken by any student who has already completed Statistics at the level of STAT 430 (including the sequence STAT 430 and 431). Such students must take an additional 200-level course to satisfy course requirements of the major. Registration also required for Recitation (see below) ECON103_Syllabus_0.pdf93.32 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON103001
ECON 104-001 Econometric Mthds/Models Xu Cheng ANNS 110 TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course focuses on econometric techniques and their application in economic analysis and decision-making, building on ECON 103 to incorporate the many regression complications that routinely occur in econometric environments. Micro-econometric complications include nonlinearity, non-normality, heteroskedasticity, limited dependent variables of various sorts, endogeneity and instrumental variables, and panel data. Macro-econometric topics include trend, seasonality, serial correlation, lagged dependent variables, structural change, dynamic heteroskedasticity, and optimal prediction. Students are required to perform several econometric analyses in a modern environment such as R. One-term course offered both terms. Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON104001
ECON 210-001 Economics of Family Jeremy Greenwood PCPE 100 MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course will use economic tools to explore decision making and allocation of resources within the family. The course will use both economic theory and econometric evidence to investigate these issues. The impact of gender roles and differences will be examined and the effect of these differences on economic decisions and outcomes both within and outside the family will be discussed. In addition, any 200-level evening course (Section 601), when offered, WILL NOT count for Economics Majors unless you are officially registered as an LPS student. Student participation will be an integral part of the course. During class, students will be required to evaluate data and relate it to the theoretic model covered. Student participation will also include two in-class oral presentations. Students will be working with CWiC (Communication Within the Curriculum) as they work on these presentations. 210rd21.pdf88.03 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON210001
ECON 212-001 Game Theory David Dillenberger PCPE AUD TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM An introduction to game theory and its applications to economic analysis. The course will provide a theoretical overview of modern game theory, emphasizing common themes in the analysis of strategic behavior in different social science contexts. The economic applications will be drawn from different areas including trade, corporate strategy and public policy. Any 200-level LPS course when offered, WILL NOT count for Economics Majors unless you are officially registered as an LPS students. course outline_2021.pdf23.77 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON212001
ECON 224-001 Econometric Mchn Learn PCPE 100 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course covers econometric methods, machine learning methods, and their interface, focusing on aspects of estimation, inference, and prediction in causal and non-causal environments. Topics may include Bayesian learning; recursive estimation and optimal filtering; randomized controlled trials and their approximation; latent variables; classification; topic analysis; LDA models; neural networks; random forests; regularization (shrinkage, selection, ...); network estimation and description. Syllabus_5.pdf144.4 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON224001
ECON 231-001 Public Finance Margaux Luflade MCNB 150 MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course has two parts. The first looks at market and government failures and discusses the need for public policies as well as limits to their effectiveness including the evaluation of public projects using cost benefit analysis. The second part focuses on the economic analysis of taxation, including the economic incidence and efficiency of taxes. Prerequisite: Credit cannot be received for both ECON 030 and 231. ECON 103 recommended. Econ231_Syllabus_2021fall.pdf180.98 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON231001
ECON 233-001 Labor Economics Andrew J Shephard PCPE 200 TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM Labor supply and labor demand, income distribution, labor market contracts and work incentives, human capital, labor market discrimination, job training and unemployment. Prerequisite: Credit cannot be received for both ECON 033 and 233. ECON 103 is recommended. econ233_syllabus_1.pdf56.99 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON233001
ECON 237-001 Urban Fiscal Policy Holger Wolfgang Sieg PCPE 200 MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM The purpose of this course is to examine the financing of governments in the urban economy. Topics to be covered include the causes and consequences of the urban fiscal crisis, the design of optimal tax and spending policies for local governments, funding of public infrastructures and the workings of the municipal bond market, privatization of government services, and public financial systems for emerging economies. Applications include analyses of recent fiscal crises, local services and taxes as important determinants of real estate prices, the infrastructure crisis, financing and the provision of public education, and fiscal constitutions for new democracies using South Africa as an example. out_e237_f21_ic.pdf48.07 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON237001
ECON 238-001 Economics of Education Francesco Agostinelli MCNB 286-7 MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM The course focuses on the educational decisions, including individual choices, institutional strategies and government policies. It is an elective course in economics and it is designed for junior and senior students. During the first part of the course we will go over the mathematical and empirical tools needed to understand and perform quantitative analysis on topics in the economics of education. Students should expect to work on optimization methods, regression analysis and causal inference analysis. We will use Stata (https://www.stata.com/) as statistical software. After we have built a solid foundation of knowledge, we will cover the first "real" topic of the economics of education: the return to schooling. During this phase of the course we seek to address two questions: what are the benefits that an individual acquires (i.e. in terms of earnings in the labor market or career opportunities) by attending more years of school and what are the benefits for society as a whole? While these questions seem to have a simple explanation, we will discover that they are actually quite challenging and require a more complex explanation. Once we have analyzed the benefits of schooling, we will study what motivates some students to further their education for more years, as opposed to others. In particular, we will focus on the differences in the quality of environments that children face throughout childhood (e.g.: family environment and school/classroom environment) and the consequences for observed inequities. Finally, in the remaining portion of the course we will study the evaluations of different policies that have been implemented in the past from previous governments, with the goal of gaining insight for possible future policy recommendations. Syllabus_ECN238_aa21_22.pdf145.31 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON238001
ECON 241-001 Economic Growth Joachim Hubmer PCPE 200 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The process of economic growth and the sources of differences in economic performance across nations are some of the most interesting, important and challenging areas in modern social science. You cannot travel or read the news without wondering why differences in standards of living among countries are so large. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduate students to these major issues nd to the theoretical tools necessary for studying them. The course therefore strives to provide students with a solid background in dynamic economic analysis, as well as empirical examples and data analysis. ECON241_Fall2021_Syllabus_AUG30.pdf162.89 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON241001
ECON 246-001 Money and Banking Harold L. Cole PCPE 200 TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Money and Banking. This course studies the role that financial markets, institutions, and money play in resource allocation. Financial intermediation and the role of banks in the economic system are analyzed and the economic rationale behind banking regulation is studies. The course examines how monetary policy influences interest rates and asset markets, such as the bond market and the stock market. Finally, the instruments and goals of monetary policy are discussed, focusing in particular on credibility and commitment for central banks. All of the questions are explored analytically, using the tools of economic theory. Syllabus2021.pdf195.8 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON246001
ECON 247-001 Macro: Structural Change Joachim Hubmer PCPE 200 TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Over the past few decades, the U.S. as well as other advanced economies have undergone a secular transformation: while overall economic growth has slowed down mildly, the fruits of economic growth have been spread unevenly. Income and wealth inequality have increased, the labor share of national income has decreased, economic activity has increasingly concentrated at a few superstar firms, and business dynamism has declined. The observed developments have generated strong reactions across the political spectrum. Is the American Dream really still alive, or might it be that a large fraction of the population simply will no longer be able to productively contribute to society? The aim of this course is to introduce advanced undergraduate students to the main empirical facts and theoretical tools involved in studying these developments through a macroeconomic lens. We will carefully analyze the data using the tools of applied (micro-)economics and interpret them using basic macroeconomic models. Interested students should have taken ECON 101, 102, 103; MATH 104, 114 or 115. Some basic knowledge of regression analysis is also recommended. ECON247_Fall2021_Syllabus_AUG30.pdf145.33 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON247001
ECON 252-001 International Finance Alessandro Dovis MCNB 150 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM International monetary economics with emphasis on economic policy in an open economy. Topics covered in the course include: balance-of-payments adjustment, theories of exchange rate determinaton, the effects of exchange rate devaluation, macroeconomic policy under fixed and floating exchange rates, the Euro-dollar market, currency and balance of payments crises. Prerequisite: In addition, the LPS 200-level course, when offered, WILL NOT count for Economics Majors unless you are officially registered as an LPS student. Syllabus_Econ252Fall2021.pdf102.51 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON252001
ECON 271-001 Foundations of Mkt Econ Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde MCNB 286-7 MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course will study the historical and intellectual forces behind the appearance of market economies on the world stage. The voyages of exploration undertaken by Europeans in the 15th and 16th century created, in just a few decades, a global economy. By 1600, silver from Mexico was exchanged in Manila for ceramics made in Nanjing (China). After a long trip through the Pacific, Mexico, and the Atlantic, the ceramics ended up in the tables of prosperous merchants in Bruges (modern day Belgium). How did this integrated global economy appear? How did global interconnections over the centuries shap our current world? How did markets emerge and influence these interconnections? Who were the winners of globalization? And who were the losers? How did economists, political scientists, and others think about the strengths and weakness of market economies? This course will explore these questions and the role that markets have played in it from the late 15th century to the present. Even if the economic theory will structure much of the discussion, insights from intellectual history, cultural history, microhistory, legal history, and institutional history will help to frame the main narrative. The course will be, as well, truly global. First, beyond the traditional focus of economic history courses on Europe and the Americas, particular attention will be devoted to Africa and Asia. Second, the priority will be to highlight the interconnections between the different regions and to understand how the people living in them negotiated the opportunities and tensions created by the economic transformations triggered by globalization and how they conceptualized the changing lives around them. Finally, the class will highlight how diverse intellectual traditions handled the challenges presented by historical change. Permission Needed From Instructor https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON271001
ECON 300-301 Honors Seminar Jere R Behrman Students prepare an honors thesis in economics over the academic year, supervised by a faculty member of their choice. In both semesters students present their work in progress to the class. Any student intending to do empirical work in the thesis should have completed ECON 103 and ECON 104. Course meets weekly. Required of all honors majors. Permission Needed From Department
Year Long Course
ECON 300 2021-22 Prospectus - Outline for 2021-22 11 July 2021.pdf424.33 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON300301
ECON 681-001 Microeconomic Theory Steven A Matthews PCPE 200 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Basic tools of microeconomic theory: consumer choice, firm behavior, partial and general equilibrium theory. This is a more theoretical treatment of the basic tools of microeconomic analysis than ECON 680. Undergraduates Need Permission Syllabus 681 Fall 2021.pdf46.06 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON681001
ECON 701-001 Microec Theory I Andrew Postlewaite
Steven A Matthews
PCPE 101 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Nonlinear programming, theory of the consumer and producer, general equilibrium. Prerequisite: Meeting the Department's minimal mathematical requirements, ECON 897 Summer Math program. Permission Needed From Department Syllabus 701A Fall 2021_0.pdf41.65 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON701001
ECON 702-001 Macroec Theory I Dirk Krueger PCPE 101 MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Dynamic programming, search theory, neoclassical growth theory, asset pricing, business cycles. Permission Needed From Department SylabusFall2021.pdf99.03 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON702001
ECON 702-002 Macroec Theory I Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde PCPE 101 MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Dynamic programming, search theory, neoclassical growth theory, asset pricing, business cycles.
ECON 705-001 Econometrics I: Fund Karun Adusumilli PCPE 100 TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Violations of classical linear regresson assumptions, nonlinear regression models (including logit, probit, etc.), diagnostic testing, distributed lag models, panel data models, identification, linear simultaneous-equations model. Prerequisite: Meeting the Department's minimal mathematical requirements, ECON 897 Summer Math Program. Permission Needed From Department Econ_705 Syllabus.pdf112.57 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON705001
ECON 705-002 Econometrics I: Fund Xu Cheng PCPE 100 TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Violations of classical linear regresson assumptions, nonlinear regression models (including logit, probit, etc.), diagnostic testing, distributed lag models, panel data models, identification, linear simultaneous-equations model. Prerequisite: Meeting the Department's minimal mathematical requirements, ECON 897 Summer Math Program. Permission Needed From Department https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON705002
ECON 712-001 Topics in Applied Micro Hanming Fang WILL 321 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department Econ712-syllabus-2021F.pdf107.05 KB
ECON 712-002 Diss Proj in Econ Theory Alvaro Sandroni W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. syllabuscontract2021upenn_0.pdf35.51 KB
ECON 712-003 Topics in Quant Macro Joachim Hubmer PCPE 101 TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department Syllabus_Hubmer_ECON712_F2021_AUG25.pdf127.36 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON712003
ECON 712-004 Emprcal Mthd For Counter: Empirical Methods For Counterfactual Analysis Francesco Agostinelli PCPE 203 MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Syllabus_ECN712_aa21_22.pdf110.4 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON712004
ECON 712-005 International Macro With: International Macro with Incomplete Markets and Financial Frictions Enrique Gabriel Mendoza M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department Econ712Fall2021.pdf186.25 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON712005
ECON 712-006 Empirical Industrial Org Aviv Nevo PCPE 101 TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department 2021Fall 712 Reading List.pdf324.03 KB
ECON 712-007 Topics in Repeated Games George J Mailath WILL 319 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Syllabus-712-21C.pdf64.28 KB
ECON 712-008 Econometrics of Networks Wayne Gao WILL 319 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department ECON712008_Syllabus.pdf39.48 KB
ECON 712-009 Topics in Education Margaux Luflade PCPE 202 MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department Econ712_Syllabus_2021fall.pdf106.84 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON712009
ECON 712-010 Topics in Econometrics Xu Cheng WILL 306 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department syllabus_econ712_Fall2021.pdf40.83 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON712010
ECON 712-011 Macroeconomic Theory: Topics in Macroeconomic Theory Alessandro Dovis PCPE 203 TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department SyllabusGradFall2021.pdf63.28 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON712011
ECON 712-012 Intro Macro Househld Het Dirk Krueger PCPE 203 MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics and prerequisites announced each year. Permission Needed From Department https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON712012
ECON 714-001 Quant Macro-Econ Theory Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde PCPE 202 M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Computation of Equilibria. Calibration of models. Heterogenous agents, macroeconomic models.
ECON 719-301 Econ Theory Workshop Kevin He PCPE 101
PCPE 101
M 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
T 03:30 PM-06:30 PM
Permission Needed From Department
ECON 721-001 Econometrics IIi: Adv Petra Todd PCPE 203 TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM Qualitative response models, panel data, censoring, truncation, selection bias, errors in variables, latent variable models, survey design, advanced techniques of semiparametric estimation and inference in cross-sectional environments. Disequilibrium models. Methods of simulated moments. Permission Needed From Department syl721fall2021.pdf114.88 KB
ECON 729-301 Econometrics Wkshop Xu Cheng PCPE 100
PCPE 100
M 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
M 03:30 PM-06:30 PM
Permission Needed From Department
ECON 749-301 Montry Econ Workshop Dirk Krueger PCPE 100
PCPE 100
WF 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM
Permission Needed From Department
ECON 775-001 Third Year PhD Seminar Harold L. Cole PCPE 203 F 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Transition from student to frontier researcher is quite difficult. This course is aimed at starting our graduate students on their first major paper. It will meet once a week over the entire year. The course will be organized into four phases as shown on the attached syllabus. Only offered to the Economics Department 3rd year PhD students. Permission Needed From Department https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON775001
ECON 779-301 Industrial Organization Juan C Castillo Hernandez PCPE 202 W 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Permission Needed From Department
ECON 789-301 Appld Micro Theory Wrksp David Dillenberger PCPE 101
PCPE 101
F 03:30 PM-06:30 PM
F 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Permission Needed From Department
ECON 792-001 Economics of Labor Francesco Agostinelli MCNB 285 MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Topics include: Theories of the supply and demand for labor, wage determination, wage differentials, labor market discrimination, unemployment, occupational choice and dynamics of specific labor markets, theory of matching, trade unions. The theory and empirics of human capital accumulation, intertemporal labor supply, search, intergenerational mobility of income and wealth, contracts and bargaining, efficiency wage models, principal/agent models, and signaling models. Permission Needed From Department Syllabus_ECN792_aa21_22.pdf110.01 KB https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=ECON792001
ECON 799-301 Empirical Microeconomics Francesco Agostinelli PCPE 100
PCPE 101
R 03:30 PM-06:30 PM
T 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Permission Needed From Department
ECON 990-001 Masters Thesis